The Location of Sound

Wondering what music everyone is listening to Sao Paulo? Now's your chance to find out. It's said music is a universal language, now, even more so with Spotify's new interactive musical world map. The map celebrates music connected to a specific place rather than music of specific time or genre. Launched mid 2015 the map links to playlists of 100 different popular songs from different cities across the world. 

Fido and Vice have created a scrollable mobile only music video that responds specifically to the users location in order to personalise the content. The video offers a unique viewing experience that is interactive and different every time you watch it, based on where you're watching it from. The music video is created through user-generated content via an Instagram hash-tag and as a result celebrates fans artwork as well as the band's sounds, who in this case in Keys n Krates. 

image via http://variety.com/2015/digital/news/spotify-puts-the-worlds-music-taste-on-a-map-1201538946/

image via http://variety.com/2015/digital/news/spotify-puts-the-worlds-music-taste-on-a-map-1201538946/

image via http://www.jam3.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Pasted-image-at-2015_09_03-11_38-AM.png

image via http://www.jam3.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Pasted-image-at-2015_09_03-11_38-AM.png


So What?
The consumer is at core of both Spotify's map and the scrollable music video. By using user-generated content, whether it be the most played songs or images for a music video the consumer is offered control over the narrative. Interestingly, in these examples, their experience is made all the more personal through the location itself.